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Tell Halaf

Tell Halaf is located in the Al Hasakah governorate of northeastern Syria, near the Turkish border. The site gave its name to Halaf culture which flourished in the 7th millenium in Norther Syria. It was discovered in 1899 by Max von Oppenheim, a German diplomat, while he was surveying the area to build the Baghdad Railway and he returned to excavate the site from 1911 to 1913 and then again 1929. Most of the monumental findings date from the Aramean kingdom Bit-Bahiani of the 10th-9th centuries BCE during which the city was named Guzana. By the end of the 9th century BCE it was incorporated into Assyrian Empire. Othostants and relief display heavy influence of Neo-Hittite style. Numerous monumental findings had been moved to Berlin which were heavily damaged during WWII bombardments, but since then many of them were restored and went on display in 2011 in Pergamon Museum (2nd and 3rd row below). Other pieces can be seen in Aleppo Museum (1st row), MET (4th row) and the Louvre (5th row).


Click on pictures for a larger image.

K.Bittel, currently in Aleppo Museum D.Osseman, Aleppo Museum D.Osseman, Aleppo Museum D.Osseman, Aleppo Museum D.Osseman, Aleppo Museum
T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010
T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010
T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010 T.Bilgin - 2010
T.Bilgin - 2007 T.Bilgin - 2007 T.Bilgin - 2007



Image sources:
Tayfun Bilgin, 2007, 2010.
Kurt Bittel, Die Hethiter, Beck, München 1976, ISBN 3406030246.
Dick Osseman, D.Osseman Syria Galleries.